History of Ice cream

Edible cones were mentioned in French cooking books as early as 1825, when Julien Archambault described how one could roll a cone from “little waffles”.[1] Another printed reference to an edible cone is in Mrs A. B. Marshall’s Cookery Book, written in 1888 by Agnes B. Marshall (1855–1905) of England. Her recipe for “Cornet with Cream” said that “the cornets were made with almonds and baked in the oven, not pressed between irons”. [2][3]

In the United States, ice cream cones were popularized in the first decade of the 20th century. On December 13, 1903, a New Yorkernamed Italo Marchiony received U.S. patent No. 746971 for a mold for making pastry cups to hold ice cream; he claimed that he has been selling ice cream in edible pastry holders since 1896. Contrary to popular belief,[attribution needed] his patent was not for a cone and he lost the lawsuits that he later filed against cone manufacturers for patent infringement.

During the 1904 St. Louis Worlds Fair, The Banner Creamery’s owner George Bang was selling ice cream. Allegedly, he ran out of bowls and was given rolled-up waffles to serve it in instead.

Chocolate ice cream in a “kiddie cup”

The earliest cones were rolled by hand, from hot and thin wafers, but in 1912, Frederick Bruckman, an inventor from Portland, Oregon, patented a machine for rolling ice cream cones. He sold his company to Nabisco in 1928, which is still producing ice cream cones as of 2012. Independent ice-cream providers such as Ben & Jerry’s make their own cones.

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